The Killing recap: Copernicus and Galileo

Linden and Holder look to the stars, Bullet and Lyric get closer, Ms. Leeds holds out hope, and Seward has a helluva day
Ep. 05 | Aired Jun 30, 2013

OH NO YOU DIDN'T! Linden's admission, that she doubted Seward murdered his wife, didn't uplift the death row inmate but sent him deeper into angry bitterness.

Carole Segal/AMC

I was really hoping for a proper, tense showdown between Mills and Kallie's mom after last week's cliffhanger. Alas, we cut straight to the SPD, where Ms. Leeds marched in soaking wet and started babbling like some methed-out crazyface. Needless to say, the world-weary front desk officer was not picking up what she was putting down. Her frustration over not getting someone to immediately find her daughter (you know, since she's cared about Kallie for a whole five minutes now) led to a full-on tantrum -- and her arrest.

Elsewhere, Holder and Linden were interviewing Angie, the Pied Piper's only target to make it out alive. One particular detail struck a chord when she mentioned that the killer instructed her to move to the back of the car before he attacked her. Was this a legitimate clue meant to remind us of Twitch's parole officer? He'd certainly have the access to these street kids, and it might even set up a connection to the Seward murder since Trisha was a hooker. But it could also be a herring as red as the plastic on which he made Angie sit.

Whoever the guy was, he wasn't Mills. Angie looked at a lineup that included Mills' photo, and didn't pick anyone out. Even after Linden's badgering, she insisted she would recognize her attacker's eyes after he stared at her in the rear-view. Then she asked naively, "He got the left [ring finger]. What if somebody wants to marry me? Do you think it matters?" Even Holder, always quick with a quip, was barely able to whisper out a brokenhearted "No." (Man, Joel Kinnaman nailed it on every level in this scene.)

Holder was back to fighting form when he went outside to criticize Linden for her pushy tactics, which could make any findings from Angie's questioning inadmissible. In fact, he was beginning to question Mills' viability as the perp at all. As they talked, Reddick arrived to continued his war of emotional attrition with Linden. It was interrupted when she got a call about Ms. Leeds' arrest and left. Reddick proved once more he was as intent as ever to phone in the case. He also got in a jab likening Holder's undercover clothes to a Snuggie and then called the newly maimed Angie "four-fifths of a hand job." Classy, Reddick. Real classy.

Linden joined Ms. Leeds in an interrogation room at the SPD. She was particularly unsympathetic to the deadbeat mom's jittery "leads" on Mills and "concerns" for Kallie given that she'd straight-up obstructed the investigation for several days. Linden did have one bone to throw: Ms. Leeds wouldn't be charged. But while they waited, she could make herself useful by telling Linden where Mills might have fled. The key word in that sentence being could since Ms. Leeds instead began a stream-of-consciousness narration about Kallie's childhood. True to life? Sure. But Sherlock Holmes (Elementary or Sherlock version) would have shut that blubbering down. You don't get to tell stories, lady. You should have told stories about Joe Mills three days ago.

NEXT: Over the Hill

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