The Good Wife recap: Thicky Trick

Will uses his knowledge of Alicia's weaknesses against her in court and Eli tries to avoid another Peter-related scandal 
Ep. 11 | Aired Jan 5, 2014

BABY MAMA DRAMA Eli asks Kalinda to investigate the paternity of Marilyn's unborn child 

David M. Russell/CBS

I keep waiting for a bad episode of The Good Wife this season. I mean, it just seems statistically probable that we'd have at least one real clunker by now. But "Goliath and David" is not it. The writers delivered plenty of laugh-out-loud moments with the case of the week, and the ep ended with a dark twist that I don't think anyone was expecting...at least not yet. So let's get to recapping!

"Goliath and David" picked up where "The Decision Tree" left off: Eli's spit take heard 'round the world. He was unsurprisingly shocked -- not the mention concerned -- when Marilyn revealed that she was naming her baby Peter, after the father. Marilyn tried to reassure him that Peter Florrick is not her baby's daddy, but Eli wanted some extra reassurance. He hired Kalinda (at the not-so-affordable rate of $500 an hour) to investigate. More on this later.

The case of the week also evolved from the Florrick/Agos holiday party. The band on hand for the shenanigans had a legal situation they wanted Alicia & Co. to tackle. The band, Rowby and Marshall (played by guest stars Matthew Lillard and Christopher Fitzgerald, respectively), had covered Rebel Kane's version of "Thicky Trick." After they released their version, the TV show Drama Camp (which is essentially a fictional version of Glee) released its own version of the Rowby/Marshall cover. The Drama Camp song subsequently became the best-selling song on iTunes. So Rowby and Marshall sought Alicia's help to get a cut of the profits. But going up against a huge television network would be no easy feat. (Hence the episode's title, "Goliath and David.")

Rowby and Marshall's manager -- who operates out of a bowling alley -- secured a compulsory license for their cover, but failed to get a derivative copyright. The compulsory license allowed them to cover the song, but only the derivative rights would protect them if they wanted to make changes to the song. In order to go forward with the lawsuit, they'd have to get the derivative rights.

NEXT: Will joins the case and battles Alicia in court....


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