The Good Wife recap: The Neverending Scandal

Diane and Alicia take on a flip-flopping opposing counsel, and Eli does all he can to stop a story that would hurt Peter's campaign
Ep. 04 | Aired Oct 21, 2012

HAPPY ENDINGS After a tough case, Diane manages to win a $6 million settlement for her clients.

CBS

It seems like The Good Wife showrunners have finally heard your complaints. "Don't Haze Me, Bro" delivered a completely Nick-free hour of TV! And for those of us who are a little fed up with the Nick/Kalinda storyline, it was a much-needed break. (Full disclosure: I loved Kalinda and Nick in the season premiere, but quickly became confused with the pairing.) I know we haven't seen the end of the unhappy couple, but I'll gladly take the one-episode hiatus to focus on more important things like Diane kicking ass in the courtroom.

This week's case involved a hazing gone wrong. Trey Lawson, a water polo player at a local college, was drowned by a teammate at a pre-game tradition called "The Dunk." The teammate responsible for Lawson's death, Wayne Crockett, had already been charged and was serving jail time. But Diane and Alicia were suing the university on the family's behalf, trying to prove that the school turned a blind eye to this hazing ritual. As a such, the school could be held liable for damages. They were seeking $6 million. (You gotta go for big money when you're staring down bankruptcy, and you've just lost the prized 27th floor. May it rest in peace.)

The opposing counsel, Jared Andrews (John Glover), claimed that "The Dunk" was never sanctioned by the university, and therefore they could not be held responsible. This was one of many arguments Andrews tried to use to keep the university out of hot water. His wishy-washy tactics kept Diane and Alicia on their toes. They had to change their approach multiple times throughout the trial just to keep up with his whatever-argument-fits-the-current-moment mentality.

Andrews then upped the ante by claiming that Lawson's drowning was a hate crime, asserting that Crockett did it because Lawson was gay. Diane and Alicia brought in Lawson's girlfriend and one of Crockett's longtime friends who happened to be gay. They assumed would put the hate crime issue to rest. But then Andrews claimed that even if Lawson wasn't actually gay, his effeminate nature could have made Crockett think he was, basically asserting that a "swishy" mannerism was enough to warrant a hate crime.

NEXT: Eli receives a threatening phone call

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